Texmo Industries Est. 1956

Submersible Pumps Comparisons

Submersible pump (Borewell) Compressors
Description

A pump which is coupled with a sealed motor and submerged inside a fluid. This then pumps the fluid, pushing it against gravity.

Reciprocating compressors consist of a cylinder with a piston in which the exhaust stroke causes a suction port to open. This then draws fluid into the cylinder and the suction stroke pushes the fluid into the discharge port.

Working principle

Fluid accelerated by the impeller loses it's their kinetic energy in the diffuser. This then causes a conversion of kinetic energy to pressure energy to take place.

Converts power from an electric motor into potential energy and stores this in the form of pressurised air. This is kept in a tank that pumps the fluid from the source.

Space

No separate space required to keep the assembly.

Significant space is occupied based on the capacity.

Applications
  • Agriculture
  • Apartments
  • Industries
  • Domestic
  • Agriculture
Advantages
  • Works well where there is a high head option.
  • No priming is required.
  • Quiet/ noise free.
  • Works well where there is an intermittent flow.
  • Assembly can be kept at a distance from source.
  • Wide range of rotational speed.
Disadvantages
  • Lower discharge than other pumps.
  • Repair is time consuming.
  • Possibility of dry run when there is less fluid (e.g. during summer).
  • Sand can enter from the water source.
  • Operation can be noisy and cause significant vibration.
  • Assembly gets heated during the operation.
  • High power consumption.
  • Less efficient than other pumps.
Submersible pump  (Borewell) Centrifugal pump (Monobloc)
Description A pump which is coupled with a sealed motor and submerged inside a fluid. This then pumps the fluid, in turn pushing it against gravity. A pump which allows fluid to enter through the eye of an impeller. The fluid then gains momentum inside the rotating vanes of the impeller and discharges through the volute casing.
Working principle

The fluid is accelerated by the impeller, it loses their kinetic energy in the diffuser; where a conversion of kinetic energy to press the energy takes place.

The fluid enters the pump impeller along or near to the rotating axis and is accelerated by the impeller, flowing radially outward into a diffuser/ casing, from where it exits.

Application
  • Residential
  • Commercial
  • Municipal
  • Industrial water pumping
  • Water sewage
  • Petroleum
  • Petrochemical pumping
Installation & maintenance Notably easy to maintain as the equipment is fully submerged. For more information on installation, see our guide. Requires protection against wind and rainfall as the assembly is kept on the surface. For more information on installation, you can see our guide.
Advantages
  • More efficient power consumption than the Centrifugal pump.
  • Works well where there is a high head option.
  • No priming required.
  • Quiet/ noise free.
  • Works well where a high discharge is required.
  • Easy to repair.
  • Doesn’t need to be as near to the water source as a submersible pump.
Disadvantages Possibility of dry run when the fluid yield is less (during summer). Can be difficult to repair. Occasionally sand can enter the pump (due to water source). Cannot handle solid particles. Can overheat due to low flows. Can leak along the rotating shaft. Cavitation and corrosion more likely than a submersible pump.

Submersible Pumps Overview

Overview

How to install a Submersible Pump

Installation Tips

Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ's

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